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NHS uses AI scan to detect hidden heart disease

NHS uses AI scans to detect hidden heart disease.

NHS uses AI scans to detect hidden heart disease. It treats people who are at risk of having heart attacks years before they happen.

According to Oxford University researchers, the CaRi-heart can detect minor issues that are missed by standard scans. They may include inflammation and scarring in the lining of blood vessels that nourish the heart.

The technique is currently being implemented in 15 hospitals across the country.

NHS uses AI scans to anticipate that up to 350,000 patients will benefit each year.

After a general computer-assisted tomography (Cat) scan, about three out of every four patients are given the all-clear.
However, one in every five of these people will have a heart attack within ten years.

When the researchers analyzed the scan data using CaRi-Heart, one in three patients previously classified as “low risk” were reclassified as “high risk.”

Dr. Cheerag Shirodaria, a former British Heart Foundation researcher who collaborated on the project, said, “The beauty of our technique is that it will not only save many lives but also exceedingly simple.”

“Any Cat heart scan may be used for CaRi-Heart analysis; hospitals don’t need to change equipment, and patients don’t need another test.” “It is well-suited to a physician’s workflow.”

Chadwick Lawrence’s clinical negligence lawyers have years of expertise handling medical malpractice cases. He offered support and counseling following life-altering occurrences. We represent clients not only in Yorkshire but also across the country as a result of our reputation.

Patients aged 40 to 70 who have had chest problems are already being offered the technology at 15 locations, including hospitals in Oxford, Leicester, and London.

Cardiovascular disease affects over seven million people in the United Kingdom, costing the NHS more than £16 billion each year.

Researchers discovered that the AI was more accurate than doctors in diagnosing breast cancer from mammograms last year.

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